The New Tech That Could Turn Police Body Cams Into Nightmare Surveillance Tools

Time and time again, police officers shoot, and sometimes kill, civilians holding harmless objects, later claiming they mistook them for guns: a cell phone, a bible, and a Wii controller. In early February, police body camera manufacturer Taser announced that it had acquired the artificial intelligence startup Dextro Inc—a “computer vision” research team that claims it can use object recognition software to train officers to better discern actual threats. But privacy experts find the surveillance and profiling possibilities offered by this latest, but certainly not last, upgrade to police body cameras unsettling. Moreover, the question remains: The cameras may be getting smarter, but are they actually making the public safer? [Read More]

Summary… * Machine-Made


But privacy experts find the surveillance and profiling possibilities offered by this latest, but certainly not last, upgrade to police body cameras unsettling.
Once Dextro has been taught to recognize an object, it can detect it in any video footage it analyzes, including dashcams, CCTV surveillance, and even aerial drone footage.
When it comes to body cameras, that accountability has been inconsistent at best.
Many supporters of body cameras believe in the importance of transparency, but what does transparency matter if it doesn’t lead to a conviction?
Body cameras are in schools, and worn by bouncers and face recognition is part of international travel procedures in Paris and Australia.

Opinion… * Man-Made


The #AI police body cams that use object recognition to train officers to better assess actual threats. #Trend

Source: Gizmodo